Reflection (1)

[Beginning a series of minute posts that examine certain poems in detail, forming a thought diary of what I’m reading as I trawl through poems by the bucket-load. Not a guarantee that all poems contained within one discrete post can be linked, just what is occupying my brain space.]

bolandnbrossard

And Soul by Eavan Boland
[https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/50005/and-soul]

Smooth Horizon of the Verb Love by Nicole Brossard
[https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/54487/smooth-horizon-of-the-verb-love]

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Where does the past belong? Where does the poet belong?: I had some very slight concerns by Susannah Dickey

Susannah Dickey, I had some very slight concerns (The Lifeboat Press £6.50)

“I concentrate on finding someone to take home so my bed looks less empty, less like the blank back pages of a photo album: the ones that come when you run out of things worth remembering.” –

from ‘It’s easy to think someone’s beautiful once they are dead’

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The excerpt above is extracted from the first of the seven poem pamphlet by Susannah Dickey, I had some very slight concerns, a lengthy prose poem in two main stanzas. An interesting opener, the poem depicts a “beautiful girl” drifting bars to bar “carrying albums filled with pictures of her dead grandparents…pictures black and jaundiced sepia”.

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Review — Fan-Poetry/Fic: Who Is Mary Sue?

Sophie Collins, Who Is Mary Sue? (Faber £10.99)

“- Your breath smells like peaches.

– Can you give me something for the pain?” — from ‘Eight Phrases’

Who Is Mary Sue? is haunted by countless figures; a nameless female writer; the eponymous O from Réage’s Story of O, ‘Mary Sue’ herself, even nothingness (in the plenty blank pages that abound, poor trees) to name a few. The book, Collins’ debut, features poems ranging from minute lyrics, extensive prose poems to found poems/reportage lifted from interviews. The spine of the text lies in the ways Collins grapples with the term ‘Mary Sue’, I quote:

“Coined by Paula Smith in 1973, ’Mary Sue’ is a pejorative term used by writers and readers of fan fiction to describe protagonists who are believed to be thinly disguised versions of the fan fic author’s idealised self.

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